Thursday, January 10TH, 8:30am-10:00am: Session I

Workshop and Speaker Information Subject to Change

Last Updated: December 13, 2018

CEU general and cultural credits approved!

 

The Indian Child Welfare Act at 40
The Indian Child Welfare At is a unique federal law applied by state court judges around the country. This has led to a body of persuasive national case law for practitioners to learn. Further, in the wake of Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl and the release of new regulations and guidelines, there has been a surge of federal litigation around the act. This presentation will provide an update on the standout state cases from across the fifty states in addition to noteworthy federal cases and opinions. It will include a discussion of New Mexico’s current case law, and how it fits with national trends.
Speaker: Kate Fort, JD

CLEs: 1.5 General

CEUs: 1.5, Cultural: 1.5

 

Moving Beyond The “Color-Blind” Policy of Transracial Adoption: Raising Physically and Emotionally Secure Children
Transracial Adoption, particularly children of color adopted by white parents in the United States, has historically been based on a “color-blind” policy where the race and culture of the children that are being placed are too often minimized by the laws that uphold this practice, the agencies that interpret them, and the parents that are choosing to care for these children. The results have shown that adoptees continue to struggle with their identities in isolation long into adulthood and parents remain inflexible and ill-prepared to meet the complex needs of their multiracial and multicultural family. While it is critical to place parentless children into permanent and stable homes, how we learn to care for these children and embrace them, is paramount.This presentation will provide a brief overview of the history of Transracial Adoption in the United States as it relates to children of color being raised by white parents, and underscore the controversy that ignited the debate on this important topic. In addition to sharing parts of her own story, Rhonda will discuss how we can address the complexities of race, culture, and identity at a systems level by preparing professionals and the families they work with to have an ongoing and open dialogue about the lifetime process of self-acceptance in a racialized society. Through the lens of the stories told in her recent award winning book, In Their Voices: Black Americans on Transracial Adoption, Rhonda will cover the Federal Adoption policy as well as ways to reimagine potential amendments to this policy that would help empower adoptive parents to raise physically and emotional secure children.
Speaker: Rhonda Roorda, Author and International Speaker

CLEs: 1.5 General

CEUs: 1.5, Cultural: 1.5

 

Rethinking the Criminalization of Addiction
Lisa Newman-Polk recently presented a case before the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts in which she argued it is unconstitutional to order an individual with a diagnosis of substance use disorder to serve jail time for a positive drug screen – as it is ordering a person with a medical condition to stop being symptomatic. This presentation will explore the history of American drug laws and how the criminalization of drug use has led to an overburdened criminal justice system and fueled our nation’s addiction crisis. Lisa will highlight how a punitive approach to substance use fails to account for a person’s history of trauma and mental health, does not treat the condition of addiction itself, and stifles our ability to respond to substance use as a public health issue. With experience in both the criminal justice and clinical social work professions, Lisa advocates for increased empathy and understanding when considering how systems respond to substance use. To have a truly public health response to this issue, the systems that criminalize and punish substance use must move towards responses of treatment, rehabilitation, and support.
Speaker: Lisa Newman-Polk, Esq. LCSW

CLEs: 1.5 General

CEUs: 1.5